Erik Bakke

Oil paint, acrylic paint, pencil, U. S. postage stamp (front and back), and male sweat on wood panel

In 1935 testosterone is synthesized, Josephine Baker stars in Prinsesse Tam- Tam, and Robert Goddard continues to test his rockets. According to nobelprize. org, “The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1939 was divided equally between Adolf Friedrich Johann Butenandt ‘for his work on sex hormones’ and Leopold Ruzicka ‘for his work on polymethylenes and higher terpenes’” (work also related to the synthesis of testosterone). The Nazi government required Butenandt to decline his share of the award. Today, recent studies have put into further question the safety of testosterone therapy while 5.3 million prescriptions are written for testosterone each year. Josephine Baker was an international star known for her dancing, singing, and acting. She was a WWII hero, working as a spy for the French Resistance, and active in the U. S. Civil Rights Movement; she was the sole female speaker at the March on Washington in 1963–on that day she spoke of the difficulties growing up African American in the United States and of her experiences that led her to France. Robert Goddard’s achievements in rocket development were borrowed by the Nazis, in the creation of their V-1 and V-2 weapons, but were not fully recognized in the United States until the dawn of the Space Age to which he so greatly contributed.

This artwork was show in the exhibition "85 Artists 85 Years." The catalogue can be seen by clicking this link.



Erik Bakke